John is an economist and advocate for social justice.   He has worked with informal vendors in Quito Ecuador and coffee growers in Mexico and Nicaragua.  He led a student group to Chiapas Mexico on a research project investigating the impact of fair trade participation on childhood nutrition and education.  Most recently he spent time in Matagalpa Nicaragua working with fair trade and traditional coffee growers and plans on returning with a student group.  His course offerings include International Economic Development, International Trade and Finance and Behavioral Economics.  When not in the classroom, John enjoys hiking, travelling and gardening.

John Messier, Director

Kristen Case teaches courses in American literature, environmental writing, and the intersection of 20th- and 21st-century American literature and philosophy.  She has published essays on Henry David Thoreau, Robert Frost, Ezra Pound, Wallace Stevens, and William James, and is the author of American Pragmatism and Poetic Practice: Crosscurrents from Emerson to Susan Howe (Camden House, 2011). Her poetry collection, Little Arias (New Issues, 2015) won the Maine literary Award for Poetry.  She is co-editor of the volumes Thoreau at 200: Essays and Reassessments (Cambridge UP, 2016) and 21|19: Contemporary Poets on Nineteenth-Century American Texts (forthcoming, Milkweed Editions). She directs Thoreau’s Kalendar: A Digital Archive of the Phenological Manuscripts of Henry David Thoreau and The New Commons Project, a public humanities initiative sponsored by the Mellon Foundation.

Kristen Case

Christine Darrohn has always been a devoted reader--as a little girl she refused to take her naps unless she could take a book to bed.  Today Christine is devoted to guiding her students to become strong readers of literature who can explore the meanings of the very smallest of textual details.  In her scholarship, Christine also examines texts closely in relation to a variety of cultural contexts, such as the Great War and attitudes towards empire.  More fundamentally, she is interested in writers' representations of the possibilities and difficulties of forming human connections across social barriers.  Holding an MFA in creative writing in addition to a PhD in literature, Christine is a published fiction writer and is currently working on a novel.  Moreover, as Campus Writing Coordinator, Christine assists faculty across campus in supporting students' development as writers. 

Christine Darrohn

In the fall of 1982, in my third year at UMF, I was asked to teach the first course in our new Honors Program, and I have been regularly involved with the program ever since, as instructor, Honors Council member, and Interim Director.   I have taught first-year classes on Greek Civilization and advanced seminars on the Irish novelist James Joyce and have led Honors trips to Portland, Boston, New York, and Ireland.  This past January, I took a group of students to Dublin to visit the Martello Tower and other Joyce sites and to walk in the footsteps of Leopold Bloom, Stephen Dedalus, Gabriel Conroy, and other Joycean characters.   I have always appreciated the ambition, intelligence, and friendliness of Honors students and the combination of serious intellectual engagement and informal good will in Honors classes.  At its best, the Honors program has been a college within the college for UMF’s best students, and it has certainly provided me with some of my most fruitful and rewarding experiences as a faculty member here.  I am grateful to Eric Brown, Michael Burke, Marilyn Shea, and all of the other Honors directors for making these experiences possible.      

Dan Gunn

Nicholas Koban has been a mathematics professor at UMF since 2006, and he teaches a wide variety of courses in the mathematics major as well as for other disciplines.  He is interested in studying sets on which algebra can be performed (not necessarily sets of numbers), but uses geometry to study these algebraic sets instead of algebra.  Each year he hires a research assistant to help with studying these algebraic objects.  These students will usually assist in his research projects along with working on their own individual project.

Nicholas Koban

Misty Krueger is an assistant professor of English at the University of Maine at Farmington. She teaches First-Year Seminar as well as writing and literature courses for the English department and Honors program. In the summer of 2017, Misty was the Jane Austen Society of North America International Visitor in Chawton, where she conducted research and volunteered at Chawton House Library and the Jane Austen’s House Museum. She has published on Austen, juvenilia, adaptation, and pedagogy. She is at work on a book about Austen’s juvenilia, and she is editing a collection of essays on eighteenth- and nineteenth-century transatlantic women travelers. In her free time, Misty loves to play board games and card games, blog about fashion, and watch sci-fi and British detective shows.  

Misty Krueger

Nancy Prentiss teaches courses in Marine Biology, Tropical Island Ecology and Field Botany. Her research focuses on surveying marine worms (polychaete) in the U.S. Virgin Islands National Park, St. John, USVI, where she is developing a database for polychaete biodiversity. She currently employs UMF students as research assistants to conduct polychaete taxonomy and to develop a UMF lab protocol for the DNA barcoding of new species found in the collection. Other interests include monitoring rare plant species in Maine.

Nancy Prentiss

Michael Schoeppner is a legal historian who writes about race and citizenship in the United States. His recent Honors course, History Road Trip, took students around the state to examine historical monuments, consider how and why we commemorate the past, and eat ice cream. In his history courses, Dr. Schoeppner often uses role-playing games to alter students' perspectives of past events. In his course, Making the Constitution, students "became" James Madison, George Washington, Ben Franklin, and the other members of the Constitutional Convention. Students quickly realized the difficulty in framing a government and the contingency of historical developments. He loves sports, coffee, his wife, beer, politics, his son Liam, reading, and traveling (though not in that particular order). 

Michael Schoeppner

Before joining the Secondary/Middle Education faculty at UMF, Maja Wilson taught for ten years in Michigan's public schools, and she was a lecturer in the Literacy Program at University of Maine, Orono. Her scholarly interests include writing assessment, automated essay scoring, teacher agency, the accountability movement, and the history and consequences of behaviorism in American education.  She is the author of Rethinking Rubrics in Writing Assessment (Heinemann, 2006), which won the Conference on English Education's James Britton Award in 2007.  In addition, her work has been published in several edited collections and in Educational Leadership, Rethinking Schools, English Journal, Kappan, Education Week, Journal of Teaching Writing, and the Washington Post Answer Sheet.  She currently teaches History and Philosophy of Education and Introduction to Secondary/Middle Education.

Maja Wilson

University of Maine at Farmington Honors Program